Developing an error-free spreadsheet has been a problem since the beginning of end-user computing.
Mireault (2015)
Spreadsheets contain errors at an alarmingly high rate.
Abraham, et al (2005)
Never assume a spreadsheet is right, even your own.
Raffensperger (2001)
Spreadsheet errors have resulted in huge financial losses.
Abraham & Erwig (2007)
1% of all formulas in operational spreadsheets are in error.
Powell, Baker, & Lawson (2009)
Spreadsheets are extraordinarily and unacceptably prone to error.
Dunn (2010)
Overconfidence is one of the most substantial causes of spreadsheet errors.
Sakal, et al (2015)
People tend to believe their spreadsheets are more accurate than they really are.
Caulkins, Morrison, & Weidemann (2006)
Spreadsheet development must embrace extensive testing in order to be taken seriously as a profession.
Bock (2016)
Spreadsheets have a notoriously high number of faults.
Rust, et al (2006)
Spreadsheets are more fault-prone than other software.
Kulesz & Ostberg (2013)
The quality and reliability of spreadsheets is known to be poor.
Bishop & McDaid (2007)
Spreadsheets are notoriously error-prone.
Cunha, et al (2011)
...few incidents of spreadsheet errors are made public and these are usually not revealed by choice.
Kruck & Sheetz (2001)
It is irrational to expect large error-free spreadsheets.
Panko (2013)
The results given by spreadsheets are often just wrong.
Sajaniemi (1998)
Spreadsheets are easy to use and very hard to check.
Chen & Chan (2000)
Errors in spreadsheets... result in incorrect decisions being made and significant losses incurred.
Beaman, et al (2005)
Spreadsheet errors are pervasive, stubborn, ubiquitous and complex.
Irons (2003)
Untested spreadsheets are riddled with errors.
Miller (2005)
Despite being staggeringly error prone, spreadsheets are a highly flexible programming environment.
Abreu, et al (2015)
Spreadsheets can be viewed as a highly flexible programming environment for end users.
Abreu, et al (2015)
Programmers exhibit unwarranted confidence in the correctness of their spreadsheets.
Krishna, et al (2001)
Spreadsheets are alarmingly error-prone to write.
Paine (2001)
Spreadsheet errors... a great, often unrecognised, risk to corporate decision making & financial integrity.
Chadwick (2002)
Despite overwhelming and unanimous evidence... companies have continued to ignore spreadsheet error risks.
Panko (2014)
Studies have shown that there is a high incidence of errors in spreadsheets.
Csernoch & Biro (2013)
Spreadsheet shortcomings can significantly hamper an organization's business operation.
Reschenhofer & Matthes (2015)
Spreadsheets are the most popular live programming environments, but they are also notoriously fault-prone.
Hermans & van der Storm (2015)
Every study, without exception, has found error rates much higher than organizations would wish to tolerate.
Panko (1999)
Your spreadsheets may be disasters in the making.
Caulkins, Morrison, & Weidemann (2006)
A significant proportion of spreadsheets have severe quality problems.
Ayalew (2007)
Every study that has looked for errors has found them... in considerable abundance.
Panko & Halverson (1996)
Spreadsheet errors are still the rule rather than the exception.
Nixon & O'Hara (2010)
Most executives do not really check or verify the accuracy or validity of [their] spreadsheets...
Teo & Tan (1999)
The issue is not whether there is an error but how many errors there are and how serious they are.
Panko (2007)
Research on spreadsheet errors is substantial, compelling, and unanimous.
Panko (2015)
60% of large companies feel 'Spreadsheet Hell' describes their reliance on spreadsheets.
Murphy (2007)
It is now widely accepted that errors in spreadsheets are both common and potentially dangerous.
Nixon & O'Hara (2010)
The software that end users are creating... is riddled with errors.
Burnett & Myers (2014)
94% of the 88 spreadsheets audited in 7 studies have contained errors.
Panko (2008)
The untested spreadsheet is as dangerous and untrustworthy as an untested program.
Price (2006)
Errors in spreadsheets are as ubiquitous as spreadsheets themselves.
Colbenz (2005)
Spreadsheets are often hard, if not impossible, to understand.
Mireault & Gresham (2015)
Most large spreadsheets have dozens or even hundreds of errors.
Panko & Ordway (2005)
Spreadsheets... pose a greater threat to your business than almost anything you can imagine.
Howard (2005)
Even obvious, elementary errors in very simple, clearly documented spreadsheets are... difficult to find.
Galletta, et al (1993)
A lot of decisions are being made on the basis of some bad numbers.
Ross (1996)
Spreadsheets are commonly used and commonly flawed.
Caulkins, Morrison, & Weidemann (2008)
Spreadsheets are dangerous to their authors and others.
Durusau & Hunting (2015)

Spreadsheet bibliography

Title Spreadsheet hell
Authors Simon Murphy
Year 2007
Type Proceedings
Publication EuSpRIG
Series  
Abstract

This management paper looks at the real world issues faced by practitioners managing spreadsheets through the production phase of their life cycle.

It draws on the commercial experience of several developers working with large corporations, either as employees or consultants or contractors. It provides commercial examples of some of the practicalities involved with spreadsheet use around the enterprise.

Full version Available
Sample
Spreadsheet management

Ideally a program of spreadsheet management would include:

  • Policies on when to use, and when not to use, spreadsheets.
  • Procedures for safe and effective development of valuable spreadsheets.
  • Features to use and those to avoid, with justifications.
  • Adequate training and coaching appropriate to job role.
  • Procedures and policies for managing the modification of live systems.
  • Policies for safely archiving retired spreadsheets.
  • Full consideration of all aspects of the systems life cycle.
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